Thanks to one of my friends, I’ve discovered a clever parody chef account on Instagram @chefjacqueslamerde. Check out the chef’s creations. Or read more at thoughtcatalog.com.

Washington state health authorities safe trying to determine how more than 55 people were sickened with salmonella in recent weeks. Two were hospitalized. 

Preliminary investigation suggests whole pig roasts at private events may have been a common factor in the salmonella cases. 

Health officials recommend that pork should be cooked to at least 145 degrees before being served. Even when cooked, food can be contaminated if such things as utensils, cutting boards, or hands are used to handle raw meat and cooked meat without proper washing between each. 

Read more at::

http://www.doh.wa.gov/Newsroom/2015NewsReleases/15135SalmonellaPorkillnesses
And
Food Safety News

Summer veggie pasta saute.
This hearty summer vegetable pasta saute takes less than 20 minutes. Shown here accompanied with arugula salad.
Quick summer vegetable pasta saute
Print Recipe
Here's a super-easy way to cook a healthy, flavorful meal using fresh vegetables and almost any kind of pasta. Great for weeknights, and leftovers are perfect for the lunch bag.
Servings Prep Time
2 15 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
10 minutes 5 minutes
Servings Prep Time
2 15 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
10 minutes 5 minutes
Quick summer vegetable pasta saute
Print Recipe
Here's a super-easy way to cook a healthy, flavorful meal using fresh vegetables and almost any kind of pasta. Great for weeknights, and leftovers are perfect for the lunch bag.
Servings Prep Time
2 15 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
10 minutes 5 minutes
Servings Prep Time
2 15 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
10 minutes 5 minutes
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Place the pasta in a 10" or larger skillet. Add cold water to cover. Add salt generously. Bring to boil, then reduce heat. Continue cooking until pasta is al dente, about 8 minutes. Add additional cold water if necessary.
  2. While pasta is cooking, dice the squash and onion. Cut the green beans (or snap peas) into 1/2-inch pieces.
  3. Add olive oil to sauté pan over medium heat, then add vegetables. Add salt and pepper and toss. Cook for about 5 minutes.
  4. When the pasta is nearly ready, drain any remaining water. Add the vegetables to the pasta in the large skillet, toss.
  5. Add cheese and basil right before serving.
Share this Recipe
 
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The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that pieces of rubber from a conveyor belt were found in this turkey sausage product that is being recalled.

Gourmet Culinary Solutions, a Statham, Ga., establishment, is recalling approximately 495 pounds of turkey sausage products that are part of a frozen entree that also contains French toast sticks and peaches. The entrees may be contaminated with foreign materials.

“You drove from New York City to Quebec to get some cheese,” asked the obviously skeptical Canadian border guard. He allowed me to proceed after I gave the only right answer: “There are many outstanding cheeses made in Quebec, sir.”

And the next adventure begins.   

 
  

Native American Crafts for sale.
Native crafts for sale at annual Indian heritage festival in Inwood, NYC.

One of the highlights of summer in the city is the array of festivals each year. In northern Manhattan, Drums Along The Hudson is an annual Native American festival that has become an annual attraction, drawing hundreds from the local neighborhoods and beyond. Traditional foods like fry bread, storytelling, and face painting are among the highlights, along with performances and demonstrations of dances and chants passed on from generations of indigenous peoples.

Here’s a short video that captures the spirit:

Here's 45-seconds that I hope captures the spirit of today's Drums Along the Hudson festival of Native American culture, held in Inwood Hill Park. (Good shot of Luis Ramos dancing at the end.)

Posted by Doug Levy on Sunday, June 14, 2015

Chefs had fun, too.
Marcus Samuelsson, Scott Conant, Alex Guarnaschelli, and Aaron Sanchez pictured.
Charles' Country Fried Chicken
Charles' Country Fried Chicken served a traditional soul food sampler, with Charles' signature chicken.
Co-Founder and host Marcus Samuelsson
Chef Marcus Samuelsson greeted guests arriving for the Harlem Stroll.
Sylvia's
Chicken and waffle, appetizer style, from Sylvia's.
Spring pea soup
Sweet spring pea soup by the Sylvia Center was one of the most memorable bites.
Co-host Bill Clinton
President Clinton poses with workers on his way out from the Harlem Stroll.
The Stroll
Part of Morningside Park was converted into the Harlem Stroll for two days.
Jerk Chicken, British Virgin Islands Style
Jerk chicken with sweet potato puree, promoting Caribbean travel.
Shaved asparagus salad
The Grange served an asparagus and prosciutto salad.
Texas beer Shiner Bock
Apparently Shiner Bock is popular in Harlem.
Crowds around chefs
The stars were out, and accessible at the Harlem Stroll.
Chefs had fun, too.
Marcus Samuelsson, Scott Conant, Alex Guarnaschelli, and Aaron Sanchez pictured.
Chefs had fun, too.
Marcus Samuelsson, Scott Conant, Al...
Charles' Country Fried Chicken
Charles' Country Fried Chicken served a traditional soul food sampler, with Charles' signature chicken.
Charles' Country Frie
Charles' Country Fried Chicken serv...
Co-Founder and host Marcus Samuelsson
Chef Marcus Samuelsson greeted guests arriving for the Harlem Stroll.
Co-Founder and host M
Chef Marcus Samuelsson greeted gues...
Sylvia's
Chicken and waffle, appetizer style, from Sylvia's.
Sylvia's
Chicken and waffle, appetizer style...
Spring pea soup
Sweet spring pea soup by the Sylvia Center was one of the most memorable bites.
Spring pea soup
Sweet spring pea soup by the Sylvia...
Co-host Bill Clinton
President Clinton poses with workers on his way out from the Harlem Stroll.
Co-host Bill Clinton
President Clinton poses with worker...
The Stroll
Part of Morningside Park was converted into the Harlem Stroll for two days.
The Stroll
Part of Morningside Park was conver...
Jerk Chicken, British Virgin Islands Style
Jerk chicken with sweet potato puree, promoting Caribbean travel.
Jerk Chicken, British
Jerk chicken with sweet potato pure...
Shaved asparagus salad
The Grange served an asparagus and prosciutto salad.
Shaved asparagus sala
The Grange served an asparagus and ...
Texas beer Shiner Bock
Apparently Shiner Bock is popular in Harlem.
Texas beer Shiner Boc
Apparently Shiner Bock is popular i...
Crowds around chefs
The stars were out, and accessible at the Harlem Stroll.
Crowds around chefs
The stars were out, and accessible ...

First attempts to produce major festivals rarely go this well. The inaugural Harlem Eat Up proved what is possible when committed chefs and the community come together and invest professional resources — and lots of their own time to make a big event happen.

Harlem Eat Up is a four-day series of special meals, workshops, chef talks, and tastings celebrating the renaissance of culinary arts in Harlem. In the years since Marcus Samuelsson opened Red Rooster on Malcolm X Boulevard near 125th Street, a long list of restaurants have followed.

The centerpiece, called the Harlem Stroll, consisted of tasting events on both weekend afternoons. Some of Harlem’s top-rated restaurants offered samples, along with dozens of beer and wine samples.

On the demonstration stage, chef Aaron Sanchez joked that he learned about herbs in Morningside Park when he was a teenager in the neighborhood. A lot has changed In those 20 or so years, including that Sanchez is a Food Network star, co-owner with John Besh of Johnny Sanchez in New Orleans and Baltimore, and chef/partner of Paloma, in Stamford, Ct.

Marcus Samuelsson and Aaron Sanchez having fun at Harlem Eat Up.
Marcus Samuelsson and Aaron Sanchez having fun at Harlem Eat Up.

Fans of television food shows had plenty to satisfy their cravings. Throughout the afternoon, some of the most familiar faces from television kitchens were visible and accessible. Daniel Bouloud walked around, while Scott Conant and Alex Guarnaschelli were part of the peanut gallery as Sanchez performed a cooking demonstration emceed by Samuelsson.

“Why does it always have to be white beans,” declared Samuelsson as Sanchez pureed beans with fish to make a version of brandade. The two bantered back and forth with good-natured jokes about each other’s ethnic and culinary background, but they saved their biggest barbs for chefs who weren’t there. Clearly, it was all in good fun.

Next year likely will be even better, but this was a fabulous start.

 

Marcus Samuelsson and Bill Clinton greeted crowds of food fans to the first (and hopefully annual) Harlem Stroll, a festival of diversity, showing off Harlem’s restaurants, neighborhood organizations, and the work of local artists. 

Celebrity chefs, local restaurateurs, and their fans strolled around three tents of tastings.

Celebrity chefs Scott Conant, Marcus Samuelsson, Alex Guarnaschelli, and AaronSanchez were among the attendees.

Former President Clinton poses with workers as he exited the event.
 
 

Highlights so far include a sweet spring pea soup by the Sylvia Center, Jerk Chicken slider by Harlem Shake, and a tasting plate by Charles’ Country Fried Chicken. 

And a hilarious cooking demo by Aaron Sanchez with Samuelsson, as other TV star chefs egged them on. 

Samuelsson and Aaron Sanchez on stage.