This Middle Eastern street food vendor demonstrates one of the most impressive frying techniques I have seen. Watch him in this video to see him craft perfect  little balls of fried dough (which a Jordanian friend of my calls “floats”) and flips them into the fryer from a distance. Fun to watch, and probably fun to eat.

 

بالفيديو: أسرع وأمهر صانع “عوامة” في الأردن

Posted by Alghad Newspaper on Monday, March 2, 2015

Thanks to my friend Primo for help translating and understanding the original post.

This video about a vegetarian’s first encounter with excellent meat by Takepart.com has it all: a great story, beautiful photography of food, and chefs explaining why they do what they do. The story is about a skilled chef and his mate, who is an experienced restaurant manager and has been vegetarian since childhood. They visit the new, hot, exciting barbecue restaurant in the Studio City neighborhood of Los Angeles, Barrel and Ashes, where Katie discovers what fabulous barbecue tastes like. And, her partner loved the vegetables. It’s fun to watch:

Barrel and Ashes also sounds like a “must” for my next visit to the Los Angeles area. Run by a chef who cooked at the French Laundry and Bouchon, two of Thomas Keller’s restaurants, it has all the ingredients for a top quality yet home style place. The pictures alone are rather enticing.

Smoked meats at Barrel and Ashes, a new haute barbecue restaurant in Studio City, Calif.
Smoked meats at Barrel and Ashes, a new haute barbecue restaurant in Studio City, Calif.

Barrel & Ashes on Urbanspoon

spatchcock turkey from Flickr via Wylio
© 2013 Brett Spangler, Flickr | CC-BY-SA | via Wylio

Half the fun of cooking poultry using the “spatchcock” method is being able to say that funny word. But it’s also a truly awesome method to cook chickens, and, as Mark Bittman has advocated since 2002, can be used to cut turkey roasting time from several hours to less than one. That can transform Thanksgiving as we know it.

Spatchcocking is simply a technique in which a chicken or turkey is butterflied by removing the back bone, so it can lay flat on a grill or roasting pan. Eliminating the bird’s cavity eliminates the biggest challenge when roasting a turkey or chicken, because it enables the heat to be more carefully controlled and not wasted on the vacant space. (Stuffing a turkey reduces the variability, too, but extends cooking time and also creates some food safety issues if the temperature isn’t monitored carefully.)

Here are a couple of resources to learn about spatchcocking turkey and how to do it:

From the Quartz.com article comes this interesting graph from Google, showing the frequency of searches for the term “spatchcock” over time: